VIETNAM | Mui Ne DIY Tour ~ Towers, Beaches & Seafood | Lakad Pilipinas

Mui Ne DIY Tour

It was a scorcher of a day, but that didn’t stop us from boarding a bus in Mui Ne and hiking a hill to visit an ancient temple this side of Vietnam. I have absolutely no inkling that this country has an almost Angkorian architecture within its lands; a very nice surprise, to say the least.

Mui Ne DIY Tour by Bus
TOURING DIY IN MUI NE

We just finished the usual Mui Ne itinerary of visiting the White and Red Sand Dunes, the Fairy Steam, and its fishing village the day before. We didn’t do it DIY though, we simply hopped on a five-dollar Mui Ne half day tour. This time, we scanned the map provided by Joe’s Seaside Boutique where we were staying and circled a few more spots worth visiting. We’re definitely doing it DIY.

Mui Ne DIY Tour by Bus
MUI NE’S CHEAP LOCAL BUS

Mui Ne DIY Tour Scenery
THE VIEW ALONG THE ROAD

 

PO SHANU CHAM TOWERS

  ADDRESS: ONG HUANG HILL, MUI NE, PHAN THIET | ENTRANCE FEE: VND 10,000.00 (USD 0.50) | OPENING HOURS: 7:30AM – 4:30PM


Boarding a local non air-conditioned bus in front of our hotel for a measly VND9,000.00 (USD0.40 | PHP20.00) we sped off westward towards the town of Phan Thiet. Before crossing borders, we got off on a deserted hilly part of town and proceeded on an uphill walk to the Cham Towers of Mui Ne.

Officially called the Po Shanu Cham Towers, these three 9th-century structures were built by the people from the Cham Kingdom whose rule over Vietnam used to extend all the way from Hue to the Mekong Delta. Fashioned after the Hoa Lai style, it was built to worship the Hindu god Shiva.

 

Not a lot is known about its history after it was unearthed in 1990, but one thing’s for sure though, it’s definitely no Angkor Wat. But even with its diminutive size and stripped off decorations due to time and repairs, it’s still a site worth your time when in Mui Ne.

 

Right at the back of the towers, there’s a war memorial and an old fortress kept off limits to the public. It was said to be constructed by a French nobleman which was later used by the French colonizers, and after the South Vietnamese against the communist north.

Mui Ne DIY Tour Cham Towers
ONE OF MUI NE’S CHAM TOWERS

Mui Ne DIY Tour Cham TowersMui Ne DIY Tour Cham Towers Fortress
SECOND TOWER UNDER REPAIR  |  THE FRENCH FORTRESS AS SEEN FROM THE ROAD

Mui Ne DIY Tour Cham Towers View
A VIEW OF PHAN THIET FROM THE HILL

Mui Ne DIY Tour Cham Towers War Memorial
WAR MEMORIAL AT THE BACK OF THE TOWERS

 

BAI DA ONG DIA BEACH

  ADDRESS: NGUYEN DINH CHIEU STREET, MUI NE, PHAN THIET | ENTRANCE FEE: NONE | OPENING HOURS: ALWAYS OPEN


After being baked brown, we traced our steps back towards the road and waited for a bus that would take us to a few of Mui Ne’s beaches. The beaches are unnamed on the Google Maps, so we have no idea what to tell the bus conductor where we were going. We just paid the minimum fare and alighted when our mobile phones told us to get off.

Seeing no opening from the road to the beach, we entered the lobby of Victoria Phan Thiet Resort [CHECK DISCOUNTED RATES & AVAILABILITY] like we were guests and proceeding towards the beach like the bosses that we are, lol.

A little note about Mui Ne’s beaches. We were told that its beach sand actually shifts depending on the season, so there are times when the only thing you’ll see are breakwaters from the resort. It’s not actually that weird, I found a similar occurrence at Boracay’s Puka Beach. The beach we entered, however, has some sort of organic sandbags protecting its shore from these shifts, so they have a beach all year round.

Going eastward, we passed some open cogon huts with seats fashioned after the Vietnamese floating tubs, the thung chai, before emerging on a sprawl of sand, the Bai Da Ong Dia Beach. The sand is quite fine and the beach, very expansive. The water’s good for swimming too as we saw a few tourists frolicking near the shore even during the sun’s zenith.

We ended our walk at the Ong Dia Cape, a man-made breakwater protecting uncountable number of basket boats along its embrace.

Mui Ne DIY Tour Beaches
WENT THROUGH A PRIVATE BEACH

Mui Ne DIY Tour Beaches
CROSSED THESE HUTS

Mui Ne DIY Tour Bai Da Ong Dia Beach
EMERGED AT THE BAI DA ONG DIA BEACH

Mui Ne DIY Tour Ong Dia Cape
AND ENDED AT THE ONG DIA CAPE

 

BO KE STREET SEAFOOD RESTAURANTS

  ADDRESS: NGUYEN DINH CHIEU STREET, MUI NE, PHAN THIET | OPENING HOURS: MORNING TIL LATE AT NIGHT


Hungry from all that walking, we boarded another bus eastward to the Bo Ke restaurants in Mui Ne (VND9,000.00 | USD0.40 | PHP20.00). Bo ke in Vietnamese actually means embankment, just as is the case with these restaurants’ location. These simple open-aired eateries start along the eastern part of town and ends just before Mui Ne’s fishing village. The selections here are, of course, very fresh, coming straight from the fisherfolks in the area.

Besides freshness, the seafood being hawked here on styro containers, plastic buckets, and fish tanks are quite cheap. Cheap for westerners, that is. Unfortunately, it’s really cheap enough for us, so we instead settled for our favorite cha gio (fried pork spring rolls), an omelet, and white rice. A break from our usual banh mi and pho meals.

We were seated right by the sea, and although the beach was not that clean due probably to its proximity to these restaurants—the wind tends to blow litter from the tables quite easily—it was still the best place to have your meals in Mui Ne. And right after, your Saigon Beer too.

Mui Ne DIY Tour Bo Ke Restaurants Grill
LOBSTERS AT ONE OF THE BO KE RESTAURANTS

Mui Ne DIY Tour Bo Ke Restaurants Beach
THE VIEW FROM THE RESTAURANT WE PICKED

Mui Ne DIY Tour Bo Ke Restaurants Meal
OUR MEAL, ABSOLUTELY NO SEAFOOD, LOL

Mui Ne DIY Tour Bo Ke Restaurants View
FATHER AND SON ON A BASKET BOAT

 






Posted by Christian Sangoyo on Thursday, September 7, 2017

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