ILOCOS SUR | Vigan Longanisa Galore | Lakad Pilipinas

Vigan Longanisa Meal

I remember exactly what I ate during my third visit to Vigan City. With a few exceptions of having some bagnet and empanada, the thing that’s usually on my plate is a bunch of Vigan longanisa. Breakfast, lunch, dinner; I don’t really care for Vigan’s other culinary delights, I wanted my garlic longanisa with my fried rice.

Uncooked Vigan Longanisa

This last visit to Vigan City, not only did I have my fill of their local sausage but I was also given an insider’s glimpse as to how they’re made. While I’m not really keen on seeing the gutty truth on how my favorite longanisa is manufactured, I went ahead with the group knowing we’d have a free taste later. Lol.

Making Vigan LonganisaWe visited the home of Jeannie Piamonte Criste, a BigueƱa who has learned the art of making the local longanisa from her grandmother. Theirs is a backyard affair; a definite indication that each sausage is made with TLC. They’ve been at it for twelve years now, selling their products at the Vigan Public Market.
Making Vigan LonganisaI never imagined how tiring it was to produce those little sausages that I so love.

From the hand-mixing of the ground pork meat with the right amount of garlic, salt and pepper (among other things), to manually filling the washed intestines with the mixed meat, right up to the final tying of each longanisa bit.

We all witnessed how much effort it took to produce a string of Vigan longanisa.
Making Vigan Longanisa

There are numerous kinds of longanisa all over the Philippines, with provinces proudly showing off their own versions of the said delicacy, so I’m quite curious as to how Vigan’s differ from the rest.

Just by looking at it, one can see that it is smaller than the average longanisa, measuring in at about three inches long. By taste, it is on the garlicky side with a hint of sourness. While there are a few garlic longanisa around the country, what makes Vigan’s different is due to the garlic they use which they simply refer to as native garlic.

Uncooked Vigan Longanisa

After every piece of longanisa has been tied off, these are then air-dried before being sold to the market. The regular-sized ones go for Php100.00 per dozen, while the bigger ones are at Php120.00.

For tourists who don’t have the time of going all the way to the public market to do their longanisa shopping, these meaty delights are readily available at the numerous stores along Calle Crisologo for almost the same price.
A Plate of Vigan Longanisa

And as expected, after all that mixing, pushing in and drying, it was time for my favorite part of the program. Now, let’s have some of that Vigan longanisa.

Vigan Public Market
Address: Jose Singson St. cor Alcantara St.,
              Vigan City, Ilocos Sur
Contact Number: (077) 722 1953
Open Hours: 6:00 am - 7:00 pm

GPS Coordinates Map: 17°34'06.8"N 120°23'05.7"E
Click to Vote Vigan New 7 Wonders Cities


Posted by Christian Sangoyo on Wednesday, September 10, 2014


  1. Kakagutom! Haha makakain nga ng longganisa sa mandaluyong haha

  2. Kainis. Turuan mo nga ako mag pochur ng ganito.

  3. Wow naglaway ako sa garlic longanisa, parang burp lang ni ano...

  4. Good Morning! I'm student of Far eastern University taking up tourism mgt. We have a Entrepreneur business planning subject we just want to conduct a survey regarding your product/s if how many longanisa and bagnet will be sold within a year? We appreciate your response to our concern. Thank you and Godbless!