BENGUET | Strawberry Farm Forever at La Trinidad | Lakad Pilipinas

Fresh Strawberries at La Trinidad's Strawberry Farm

“Let me take you down, coz I’m going to Strawberry Fields…” The classic Beatles song was floating over my head as I asked around Baguio’s Burnham Park on how I can commute to the famous Strawberry Field in La Trinidad, Benguet via jeepney. My budget was really limited so I was avoiding taxicabs like the plague.

A Farmer Harvesting at La Trinidad's Strawberry FarmI would have walked all the way to the La Trinidad if it was not so freaking far by foot. The strawberry plantation is located more than ten kilometers out from Baguio City; it might take me half the day to reach it. I’ve been to the place twice before and I really didn’t find the road going there to be that scenic, so I felt it’s gonna be a waste of time if I do my usual long jaunt.

Local Sweets at La Trinidad's Strawberry FarmMy fare totaled to Php11.00, a tenth of what I paid by cab from before. I crossed the highway and I was soon strolling down the familiar narrow road leading to Benguet’s Strawberry Farm. Stores selling local handicrafts, sweet treats and souvenirs welcomed me as I slowly made my way through, savoring the cool weather and the early morning sun along the way.

Souvenirs at La Trinidad's Strawberry FarmKey chains fashioned after strawberries were piled at many of the stalls; some carved in wood, a few craftily crocheted from red and green twines. These artificial strawberries sit next to fresh produce harvested from the field, for the Strawberry Farm also yields other veggies besides the sweet fruit.

Inspecting a Brocolli at La Trinidad's Strawberry FarmLettuces, broccolis, cauliflowers and tomatoes are just a few of the vegetables harvested from the area. Now I know why my aunts always insist that I bring home a few kilos of veggies whenever I climb to Baguio City, the produce here are really fresh.

The Fields at La Trinidad's Strawberry FarmStrawberry Farm is located on a plain surrounded by a few clumps mountains. You can see nothing but greens, greens and more greens. The plantation stretches to the horizon, broken only by the local houses at the foot of the mountains.

Surrounding Mountains at La Trinidad's Strawberry FarmThe mountains themselves deserve a second look especially during the afternoons. Although I have never personally witnessed one in the area (almost but not quite), I’m betting my cameras that sunsets at the Strawberry Farm can be dramatic. I can just imagine the mist-covered mountains streaming the sun’s ray down the endless fields of strawberries.

La Trinidad's Strawberry FarmBut what really drive folks visiting Baguio City to the farm are of course the strawberries themselves. And what’s so different from the ones grown here than those being sold at the market you might ask? Well? Absolutely nothing.

Mother and Daughter Picking Strawberries at La Trinidad's Strawberry FarmThe difference lies in how one gets them strawberries. In markets, you buy them from a stall and that’s it. But at the Strawberry Farm, you pick them from the earth yourself. You then have them weighed and then you whip out your wallet and pay for them. That’s right you are your own strawberry farmer.

A Tourist Picking Strawberries at La Trinidad's Strawberry FarmThe attraction I presume comes from the romanticized notion of us plucking deliciously red strawberries straight from the low-growing plants. I guess it’s sweeter that way. And honestly, when can you ever say you’ve picked your own strawberries? It’s not like you can just grow them on your own backyard.

Tending Strawberries at La Trinidad's Strawberry FarmThe irony here though is that the strawberries you end up buying here are almost double the price than those at the market. You toil with the laborious task of sitting and plucking and you pay twice the price?
Rows of Strawberries at La Trinidad's Strawberry FarmThe reason they say is that picking strawberries is a delicate business. Clumsy hands tend to easily squash the fruits to a messy pulp, leaving a lot of loss revenues for the farmers. And then there is also the temptation of eating the fruits as you go, which is really not that easy to resist, seeing how plump and fresh these temptations area.

Strawberries at La Trinidad's Strawberry FarmAnd of course, the experience of plucking that shiny red heart-shaped fruit itself is priceless, unless you’re on a budget like me, that is. So I contented myself with simply watching and taking pictures. Strawberries are not my favorites anyways (talk about a sour grape har har).

Strawberry Ice Cream at La Trinidad's Strawberry FarmWhat I can afford though is the next best thing to fresh ripe strawberries.

As I walked along the narrow dirt paths along the field, I came across an ice cream vendor, selling what else, but strawberry ice cream. With the day quickly turning into a scorcher and with the treat at only Php10.00 for a cone, I certainly have to try it out. Now no one can ever say that I didn’t even try the sweet strawberries at La Trinidad’s Strawberry Farm. I certainly did and it is brain-freezingly good!


La Trinidad Location MapStrawberry Farm
Address: Brgy. Puquis, La Trinidad, Benguet
How to get there via jeepney: Take a Trinidad bound jeep from the Baguio City Hall and ask the driver to drop you off at the Strawberry Farm. Fare is Php11.00

GPS Coordinates: 16.453413,120.581603
View Location on Google Maps


´

Posted by Christian Sangoyo on Friday, February 15, 2013

21 comments:

  1. I'm loving the Beatles reference! And your pictures are beautiful, as always. :)

    P.S. the treats found inside those wooden balls - are they still called kulangot? Haha! I remember being so amused that it was called that when I was a kid. I haven't tried it in ages. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Haha they are still indeed called "sundot kulangot" :D

      Delete
  2. Love it! Nice photos! Makes me wana pack my bags tonight and head for Baguio!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Pao, that is the ultimate compliment a travel blogger can get :)

      Delete
  3. i wonder how did you resist from eating those strawberries.

    ReplyDelete
  4. yep, they're expensive.. as a baguio local, i probably did that once or twice only.. lol..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My aunts used to do this too but I haven't personally. Mahal nga hehe

      Delete
  5. Well I love strawberries! Those sweet and juicy with a hint of sour fruit especially the red ones are delicious and my favorite. Thanks for sharing how to commute from Baguio to Benguet, I didn't know that. Is it also the same going back?

    We're planning a budget trip to Baguio and thinking this farm as a side trip but but the double price of those fruits turns me off.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Baguio travel agenda cannot be complete without visiting the renowned La Trinidad Farm. Fresh produce are abundant but nothing comes close to the famed Baguio strawberries.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Haha I agree, although technically, I guess these are really not Baguio strawberries anymore :)

      Delete
  7. yay! me loves strawberries! i'd definitely love baguio too! :P

    ReplyDelete
  8. I love the pictures you got there, when I saw those pictures of strawberries I missed the time when I was in Baguio and also the lines from the Beatles song how interesting is that. Here's a good news, there will be an event this year called Strawberry Festival, you can read this blog for more details: http://urbanmala.info/blog/?p=663

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wow, that's nice! Another reason to visit Benguet then :)

      Delete
  9. How much po ung strawberies dun?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Can't remember exactly, but they're quite affordable

      Delete
  10. is still P11.00 is a fare from baguio city hall to strawberry farm til now.?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Rene, I guess it's still around that price. I recently went to the border of La Trinidad and the fare's around PHP8.50

      Delete
  11. Hello, does anyone know the operating hours in Strawberry Farm? Thanks! Will visit late November :)

    ReplyDelete