SIQUIJOR | Lazi Convent | Lakad Pilipinas

We left Lazi Church still dazed from the musty oldness of its atmosphere, crossed the Acacia-lined plaza street and entered what was once considered as the largest convent in Asia.

Having an area of 2,500 square meters, Lazi Convent was considered a giant amongst its kind during its days. It was erected in 1887 in conjunction with the town church which was made thirty years earlier. Friars in those times used the structure as a resting place and a recreation area; I just can’t imagine what friars do for recreation.

The Lazi Convent is built in the tradition of Filipino Stone Houses or Bahay na Bato. The ground floor is made up of coral stones, similar to the ones made to build the nearby church, and the upper floors of wood. Carved wooden barandillas line the second floor, framing the traditional capiz windows above it. The convent’s tin roof, curving slightly along its apex, doubles the height of the convent making it look quite imposing. Arches line up the corridors around the ground floor which are now being used as classrooms for the local kids. We can hear the chorus of children reciting as we entered the building. Passing an old dog sleeping along the hardwood grand stairwell, we proceeded along its interiors.

Much of the second storey is unused and derelict save for one room which had been converted into a museum of sorts. It’s such a shame really as the whole floor can be a museum into itself. The floors are of the same Narra wood made in herringbone pattern as that of the church and as far as I can see everything is made up of old antique wood.

The museum which was inaugurated last 2005 was closed when we visited, good thing our guide knew the caretaker and he let us take a peek inside and even allowed us to photograph a few of the relics as long as we don’t use any flash. I’m not sure I understand why photography is not allowed inside.

Like the San Isidro Labrador Church and this convent, the museum is also in a bad state. The exhibits are exposed to heat and the elements which can easily degrade and destroy them. Most of the displays are relics found from the church and convent; religious icons, old books, frocks, black and white photographs, antique furniture and random things like an old rusty typewriter.

One of the most interesting things I found inside was the birth and death registrars kept by the convent. The covers which are made of carabao hide are now crumbling and its pages, waterlogged. The handwriting inside was really really beautiful and I can just imagine the history that resides within those penstrokes.

I felt saddened about the condition of the museum and I hope the donations being given as a fee to enter the museum (a mere Php20.00) be supplemented by the local government to save these relics from fading into history.

The light was slanting along the colored glasses of the Lazi Convent as we exited the museum. The dog we met earlier at the stairwell bade a farewell look at us. My thoughts were still filled with Siquijor’s musty history as our tricycle roared into the silent streets of Lazi.



Lazi Convent | San Isidro Labrador Convent
Siquijor Circumferential Road, Lazi, Siquijor
GPS Coordinates: 9.127341,123.633002
Click to view location on Google Maps 
Museum Entrance Fee: Php20.00 per person 
Recommended Siquijor Island Tour Guide:
Kuya Joam: 0927-6932095
Fee: Php1,000.00 inclusive transportation,
port pick-up, lodging transfer and lots of stories :)


        SIQUIJOR THREE-DAY SERIES
        TRIP ITINERARY | MANILA - DUMAGUETE CITY - SIQUIJOR | ST. FRANCIS DE ASSISI CHURCH | CAPILAY’S SPRING PARK AT SAN JUAN
        OVER AND BELOW LAZI’S CENTURY-OLD BALETE TREE | LAZI CHURCH - SAN ISIDRO LABRADOR PARISH | LAZI CONVENT
        THE CAMBUGAHAY FALLS AT LAZI | SANTA MARIA CHURCH & ITS BLACK MARIA | SUNSET ON THE ROAD
        SAN JUAN’S COCO GROVE RESORT | COCO GROVE ACCOMMODATIONS AT SAN JUAN | COCO GROVE’S SUNSET RESTAURANT
        SUNSET AND SUNRISE AT SAN JUAN’S TUBOD BEACH

´

Posted by Christian Sangoyo on Thursday, June 28, 2012

13 comments:

  1. i hope na mapapreserve pa rin to

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  2. yung font parang kapareho ng sulat mo pre. haha
    i love the photo of the colored glasses.
    its really sad that filipinos doesnt have the sense of history- we dont know how to take care our heritage and artifacts

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  3. amazing that it's still standing, ang galing lang. :D

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  4. I love the colored glass window show especially the first pic where it is a stand-out and a drama to the photo.

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  5. I live the photo of old literature/notes.

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  6. I have been planning to visit for the longet time. I should!

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  7. Kulatipot
    I hope so too, it's now crumbling down

    Journeyingjames
    Haha mas maganda naman hamok yung sulat nila

    Anny
    Still standing at the moment, hopefully it lasts some more years

    Ian
    Ang ganda lang ng ilaw diba :)

    Glenn
    We were lucky enough to be allowed to photograph the relics :)

    Lifeisacelebration
    Indeed you should! :)

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    Replies
    1. Saint Isidore is an amazing place! i should know much because of the fact that i graduated from my nursery, elementary, and high school years there. I am now in my first year in college yet, i still do my best to visit my alma matter every month. why? because even after going to school there for 16 years, its still as strong as it was decades ago in the hearts of everyone who's lives have part of the school with them even though the school is slowly starting to crumble. Saint Isidore is my second home. She is my second love and always will be. And i would do anything to help her, so if i may, i would like to encourage everyone to please visit my alma matter. Your visits would help her in many ways, take for example, support for our museum. It would mean a lot. Thank you for all of your kind comments and i hope you can find time to visit even for just a summer or a quick stop. :) have a good day and God Bless

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    2. Hi Khylie, wow an actual graduate from Lazi convent! Thank you for dropping by and sharing your growing experiences at the school :)

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  8. Really love the photos you took of the convent. Ang ganda ng detail shots of the book and handwriting. I really wonder how museums in provinces will be able to preserve places like these when they still only charge 10-20 pesos entrance fees up to now. :(

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  9. Really beutiful building and such a wonder history. It's really sad that our government cares less for conservation projects these days. =(

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  10. each of your photo is so dramatic, hangganda pa ng lighting, sana mapreserve nga ito..kelangan ng funds siguro

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  11. Kara
    Oo nga, the fee is too low for proper maintenance

    Tin
    For poor provinces, ganun ata talaga. They have different priorities

    Aadventurousfeet
    Thanks Ca, sakto ang ganda ng ilaw nung dumaan kami jan :)

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